Informal reading inventory examples

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informal reading inventory examples

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Wish List. Informal Reading Inventory. Teachers, paraprofessionals and parents will be able to quickly and easily estimate a student's reading skill using this IRI. Includes clear, easy-to-follow instructions! Grades preprimer to 5 included. Over 50 pages! Kindergarten1 st2 nd3 rd4 th5 thHomeschool. AssessmentEBooksPrintables. This IRI is specifically designed for students reading at a fifth grade level.As a classroom teacher, reading specialist, and university professor, I have always found helpful published summaries or syntheses of professional-related information relevant to my work.

In this article, I review the current editions of eight informal reading inventories IRIs published since that are available at the time of this writing. A goal of this undertaking is to guide teachers, reading specialists, reading coaches, administrators, professionals in higher education, and others charged with the education or professional development of preservice or inservice teachers in their quest to find IRIs best suited to their specific needs. I hope the findings point to new ways in which IRIs can be made even more effective in the near future.

Informal Reading Assessments: Examples

IRIs are individually administered diagnostic assessments designed to evaluate a number of different aspects of students' reading performance. After reading each leveled passage, a student responds orally to follow-up questions assessing comprehension and recall. Using comprehension and word recognition scores for students who read the passages orally, along with additional factors taken into consideration e.

They also use this information to match students with appropriate reading materials, place children in guided reading groups, design instruction to address students' noted strengths and needs, and document reading progress over time. While IRIs serve a variety of purposes, perhaps their greatest value is linked to the important role they play in helping educators to diagnose the gaps in the abilities of readers who struggle the most.

For example, by charting and analyzing patterns in oral reading error types, educators identify whether students rely on one cueing system i. Supplemented by other measures of literacy-related knowledge and abilities, as needed, IRIs contribute valuable information to the school's instructional literacy program. For example, federal guidelines specify that the screening, diagnostic, and classroom-based, instructional assessments used by schools receiving Reading First grants to evaluate K-3 student performance must have proven validity and reliability U.

Department of Education, require that educators in Reading First schools evaluate students in the five critical areas of reading instruction i. Given these federal mandates, it was assumed that IRIs published since would be more apt to exhibit the technical rigor and breadth in assessment options necessary to help reading professionals achieve these goals.

The names of specific IRI instruments identified were obtained from searches in the professional literature or recommended by professionals in the field of literacy. In all, eight IRIs were identified, examined, and cross-compared with regard to selected features of their most current editions. In order to cross-compare selected features of the current editions of all eight IRIs, a coding spreadsheet was prepared and used to assist in the systematic collection of data.

The categories used were chosen because of their relevance to issues in the professional literature e. To ensure the accuracy of the coded data, I enlisted the assistance of a graduate student who independently coded one of the IRIs.

Afterward, our data charts were compared and the percentage of agreement was determined with differences resolved by discussion. Following this interrater reliability check, data from the separate coding sheets for each IRI were rearranged and compiled onto additional charts in various ways in order to facilitate comparisons and the detection of patterns among variables of interest.

In all, eight IRIs published since were analyzed and compared in order to identify the variety of ways in which the instruments approach key issues relevant to their use. Based on the analysis, it is evident that the eight IRIs reviewed range in the assessment components they include and in which critical aspects of reading instruction identified by the NRP NICHD, they assess.

For example, measures for reading comprehension and vocabulary i. An analysis of the IRI features related to each of the five pillars of reading follows.

According to Standards for Educational and Psychological Testinga fundamental concern in judging assessments is evidence of validity. Assessments should represent clearly the content domain they purport to measure. For example, if the intention is to learn more about a student's ability to read content area textbooks, then it is critical that the text passages used for assessment be structured similarly. Based on their study of eight widely used and cited IRIs, Applegate, Quinn, and Applegate concluded that there were great variations in the way IRI text passages were structured, including passages with factual content.

They observed that biographies and content area text, in some cases, matched up better with the classic definition of a story. In a similar manner, Kinney and Harry noted little resemblance between the type of text passages included in many IRIs and the text type typically read by students in middle and high school.

Thus, it makes sense that if the goal of assessment is to gain insights on a student's reading of textbooks that are expository, then the text used for the assessment should also be expository.

Relative to the IRIs examined for this analysis, text passages varied by genre and length as well as by whether the text included illustrations, photos, maps, graphs, and diagrams. A discussion of the ways in which the various IRIs approach these issues follows.

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With regard to the text types included in the IRIs under review here aligned with the perspective that reading comprehension varies by text typefive of the eight IRIs provide separate sections, or forms, for narrative and expository passages for all levels, making it easy to evaluate reading comprehension and recall for narrative text apart from expository material Applegate et al.Two of the primary methods are formal and informal assessments.

Formal assessments include tests, quizzes, and projects. Informal assessments are more casual, observation-based tools. With little advance preparation and no need to grade the results, these assessments allow teachers to get a feel for student progress and identify areas in which they might need more instruction. In the classroom, informal assessments are important because they can help identify potential problem areas and allow for course correction before students are required to demonstrate understanding at a formal evaluation.

Informal assessments can also provide vital student feedback without the stress of tests and quizzes. Following are just a few examples of creative informal assessments for your classroom or homeschool.

Observation is the heart of any informal assessment, but it is also a key stand-alone method. Simply watch your student throughout the day. Look for signs of excitement, frustration, boredom, and engagement. Make notes about the tasks and activities that elicit these emotions. Author Joyce Herzog has a simple but effective method of observing progress. Do the same process once a quarter or once a semester to gauge progress.

We often think of oral presentations as a type of formal assessment, but they can be a fantastic informal assessment tool, as well. For example, if you are learning about parts of speech, you could ask your students to name as many prepositions as they can in 30 seconds while you write them on the whiteboard. A broader approach is to present students with a sentence starter and let them take turns finishing it. Examples include:. Give your students one to three minutes at the end of each day to journal about what they learned.

Vary the daily journaling experience by asking students to:. Let your students write questions for each other on a piece of paper.Jump to navigation Jump to Content. The following are sample charts you can use when assessing students informally in the classroom. Most of the assessments here should be given one-on-one. It is important that you have a non-distracting, comfortable testing environment for students, and that the rest of the class is engaged in a task or assignment and working quietly.

It's even better if you can arrange for another teacher to be present while you are performing assessments. Sit in a quiet corner of the room with a student. Give the student a storybook and ask the questions on the form below.

This form can be used several times over the course of the year.

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Write the date in the space marked yes or no. Tasks that are not successfully completed should be periodically tested until the student can accomplish all tasks with ease and confidence. Teacher: "Do you know what rhyming words are?

If he or she answers "no" or incorrectly then explain: "Rhyming words are words that end with the same sound. For example, the words cat and mat rhyme. I'm going to say two words. I want you to tell me if they sound alike at the end. Say each word pair listed below. If the student responds correctly, circle Yes. If the student responds incorrectly, circle No.

informal reading inventory examples

Teacher: "Sometimes words start with the same sound, like in the words: fat and fun. I'm going to say two different words, and I want you to tell me if the words start with the same sound. Let's try one. Teacher: "Let's play 'Guess My Word'.

Informal Reading Inventory (IRI) Report

I'm going to say a word but I'm going to say it slowly. I want you to see if you can guess the word I'm trying to say. For example, can you guess this word?

If the student responds correctly, circle Correct. If the student responds incorrectly, circle Incorrect. Teacher: "Now let's try something different. Let's play another word game.It is important that you have a non-distracting, comfortable testing environment for students, and that the rest of the class is engaged in a task or assignment and working quietly.

It's even better if you can arrange for another teacher to be present while you are performing assessments. Sit in a quiet corner of the room with a student. Give the student a storybook and ask the questions on the form below.

This form can be used several times over the course of the year. Write the date in the space marked yes or no. Tasks that are not successfully completed should be periodically tested until the student can accomplish all tasks with ease and confidence.

Teacher: "Do you know what rhyming words are? If he or she answers "no" or incorrectly then explain: "Rhyming words are words that end with the same sound. For example, the words cat and mat rhyme.

I'm going to say two words. I want you to tell me if they sound alike at the end. Say each word pair listed below. If the student responds correctly, circle Yes. If the student responds incorrectly, circle No. Teacher: "Sometimes words start with the same sound, like in the words: fat and fun. I'm going to say two different words, and I want you to tell me if the words start with the same sound.

Let's try one. Teacher: "Let's play 'Guess My Word'. I'm going to say a word but I'm going to say it slowly. I want you to see if you can guess the word I'm trying to say. For example, can you guess this word? If the student responds correctly, circle Correct. If the student responds incorrectly, circle Incorrect. Teacher: "Now let's try something different. Let's play another word game.

I'm going to tell you a word.We all need to use assessments in our classroom to determine how our students are doing with the content, but if you are like me, you get a little bored with the same old thing every time. I mean, just how many times can you do the ticket out the door?

And if you are getting bored, you know your kiddos are, too! To be a bit creative, they are in alphabetical order.

13 Creative Examples of Informal Assessments for the Classroom

Some you may have heard of, while others may be new to you. These are all ideas I have collected and compiled for you. The overall goal is to build your toolkit and to help you come up with some new ideas the next time you need an informal assessment. In the end, I have all these ideas in a PDF form for you to download and to reference later.

For some of these, there are pictures to make it easier for you to see. For others, there is just a description. Before the start of a unit, you would provide students with a few statements related to the unit. Students check if they agree with the statement or not. This helps you get an idea of their prior knowledge. Then, after you have taught the unit, you can go back and reassess to see if their thinking has changed any.

B — Bump in the Road. In this informal assessment, students write down something from the lesson that they found confusing or difficult. I love this one, but I have always enjoyed a good snowball fight!

informal reading inventory examples

Each student writes a question about something that was discussed during the unit. Then, students will open the crumpled paper and answer the question. If desired, you can then re-crumple and toss it again. Have the next student who opens it add any additional information. You can continue one more time and have students add anything, make changes, or even present the class with a new question or answer.

In this activity, you would present the class with a question and have them write a response on a strip of paper. Then, students begin passing around a stapler and add their link to a chain that begins forming.

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Have students pair up and both have mini-whiteboards. They will stand back-to-back. The teacher will ask a question while they both respond on their whiteboards. After a few minutes, the students both turn around and show their answers. A discussion then occurs. Students write a response to a question posed by a teacher on either a sticky note or a slip of paper provided by the teacher. This can be provided when students enter the classroom, related to something prior to the learning, or after students have learned the content, it can be given to them on the way out.

Some teachers have done both. This has been used as a method to help teachers assess whether they need to review or reteach.

There are many ways to assess using exit tickets. Check out my post on 24 Exit Ticket Ideas! In this assessment, the teacher places terms, answers to questions, or concepts in each of the corners of the room. An alternative is to place a multiple choice question on a doc cam and have students move to the labeled corner that they think is the answer.

Like this one:. Then, students will form lines behind the labels.Jalissa seems to be in good health with no reported learning disabilities or retardism. Her class teacher reports that she behaves well in class and is not negligent towards her in class work and home assignments. Overall Jalissas teacher rates her as a very good student. During this conversation she indicated to me that she enjoys helping younger brother with his home lesson, she has interest in netball and she will like to learn different languages.

Jalissa seems quite ambitious and has already set certain goals that she will like to look forward to if given the opportunity. Her teacher has previously informed her that I will be coming to meet with her in order to gather some information that can help her with her reading. She seemed to have become quite comfortable around me, with little fear or nervousness to take the Informal Reading Inventory IRI. Since standard three 3 is known to be level 5when administering the Informal Reading Inventory IRII started Jalissa at level three 3 in which will be two 2 levels below her expected reading outcome.

Given that Jalissas last succeeded level of the word recognition skills was at level 6I started her oral reading onle 1 level below that which was at level five 5 ; the level of her current class level.

At year seven 7 she is still at the instructional level in Word Recognition, but enters the level of frustration in Comprehension. Her level of frustration was not reached in Word Recognition Skills.

Overall, I think that Jalissa performed well, without limitations of fear, nervousness or discomfort. At this point, I see no need for any recommendations for special education or other special instructions. Jalissa should just continue to keep focused in order to maintain her present abilities to excel her potential. Learn more about Scribd Membership Home. Read Free For 30 Days. Much more than documents. Discover everything Scribd has to offer, including books and audiobooks from major publishers.

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